Current and Upcoming

National Indigenous Peoples Month: Küifi ùl/Sonido Antiguo (Ancient Sounds of Water), by Francisco Huichaqueo Pérez

National Indigenous Peoples Month: Küifi ùl/Sonido Antiguo (Ancient Sounds of Water), by Francisco Huichaqueo Pérez

June 1- 30, 2024

Streaming on Vtape.org

 

This year, Vtape celebrates Indigenous Peoples Month with an online screening of Küifi ùl/Sonido Antiguo (Ancient Sounds of Water) by Francisco Huichaqueo Pérez.

 

Küifi ùl/Sonido Antiguo (Ancient Sounds of Water) highlights the forms of racialized violence that the Mapuches continue to endure under the Chilean state in southern Chile, and their praxes of resistance, by centering the Mapuche water practices during the winter solstice in Chile. To celebrate “the return of the sun” or Wiñoy Tripantu in Mapuzugun in June each year, there is a ceremonial bathing that occurs four times for the four points of the earth. In this film, Huichaqueo captures this ceremony via reflecting upon the journey of a father and daughter who ritually renew the river on horseback. More broadly, the film also connects historical traumas and the environment as the film’s cinematography seeks to capture both the significance of the rivers for these Indigenous communities and the cosmovision of Mapuche communities. Huichaqueo asserts that this film presents Indigenous understandings of “energy” that expand our cluster’s understanding of this term to also include Indigenous epistemologies around aquatic ecosystems, the earth, the cosmic, and sustainable Indigenous ways of “futuring.”
– [Source: https://orfaleacenter.ucsb.edu/https-orfaleacenter-ucsb-edu-partner-page-huichaqueo-future-infrastructures-water-energy-and-justice/]

Francisco Huichaqueo Pérez was born in Valdivia in southern Chile in 1977. He is a visual artist, filmmaker, and professor at the School of Visual Arts at the University of Concepción. He currently leads the First Nations portion of the Festival Internacional de Cine de Valdivia. His video installations, film documentaries, and film essays focus on themes central to his Mapuche heritage. In his oeuvre, Huichaqueo addresses the social landscape, history, culture, and cosmovision of his people. His audiovisual work has been exhibited at various indigenous film festivals such as ImagineNATIVE, in Toronto; the Museo Arqueológico de Santiago; and the National Museum of the American Indian, in Washington, DC. He has also held residencies in film and art in Taiwan and France. His work has been exhibited in Chile, France, Canada, Germany, the United States, Spain, Italy, Argentina, and Bolivia.

 

Image credit: kuifi ül/ Sonido antiguo or Ancient Sounds of Water, Francisco Huichaqueo Pérez (2021).

Screening: Where do our memories go? Curated by Kai Trotz-Motayne

Screening: Where do our memories go? Curated by Kai Trotz-Motayne

Wednesday, June 19th, 2024 at 7:00 pm

Vtape, Bachir/Yerex Presentation Space

4th floor, 401 Richmond St. W. suite 452

This summer, Vtape is excited to present two programs from our Curatorial Incubatees. This year’s Curatorial Incubator v.19: Island in the Streams called for projects that explore collections, how they are accessed online as never-ending digital repositories, and how we can interrupt the stream to create new moments for refuge. Emerging curators do independent research using the rich resources available through Vtape, write a curatorial essay for their program of selected titles, and, finally, present their curated program to the public.

Kai Trotz-Motayne’s program Where do our memories go? which explores the changing landscape of Caribbean communities in Toronto and how rituals are passed on and reconstructed through generations. In historian Robin Cohen’s 1998 essay Cultural Diaspora: The Caribbean Case, Cohen describes how diaspora involves “a literal or symbolic interest in return.” Reflecting on her own community of second-generation Canadians who have spent little to no time in the Caribbean, Kai asks, “How do we continue to engage our history?”

 

Where do our memories go? 

Curated by Kai Trotz-Motayne

Maigre Dog, Donna James, 1990, 07:50
The intention in making Maigre Dog was to celebrate the Jamaican women who nurtured Donna James growing up and surrounded her with their vernacular language. James wanted to present the voices of these women and evoke the warmth of countless hours spent in steamy kitchens filled with the smell of food cooked with love. Listening to them “talk that talk” about their lives, their men, and their pain, James wanted to acknowledge the roles that oral history and circular thinking have played in her own development. The tape reveals layers of thought, whispers of memories, and circles of knowing, which together evoke the complexity of the life process.

Home, Jason Ebanks, 2004, 14:30
A documentary exploration of the word “home,” as told by Black artists living in Toronto.

Making Sweetbread with Gran, Raquel Rowe, 2020, 07:40
Racquel Rowe: “Making Sweetbread with Gran is one of my works where I focus on the matriarch of my family as she does different tasks. I was fortunate enough to spend the summer at home in Barbados where I spent time learning how my granny makes traditional Barbadian dishes. This work examines the relationship between culture, food, history, and the passing on of traditions.”

Seeing is Believing, Shaunna Beharry, 1991, 08:27
The artist’s camera searches a photograph of her mother, following the folds of the silk sari in the photograph as they dissolve into grain and resolve again.

Homesick, Natalie Wood, 2007, 03:14
Homesick is an experimental and dream-like video that documents a drive over the Maracas hills. The drive is winding and scary and conveys the artist’s struggle with her relationship to her homeland. The viewer comes along for the drive and we both end up hitting a wall that takes us into another space populated by a Moko Jumbie — a spirit healer — who moves us in a dance in a non-linear time and space that heals.

 

STREAMING: What happened to produce these ruins? Curated by Muriel N. Kahwagi

STREAMING: What happened to produce these ruins? Curated by Muriel N. Kahwagi

Streaming on Vtape.org from June 7th – 21st

In-person screening Thursday, June 6th, 2024, at 6:30 pm

Vtape, Bachir/Yerex Presentation Space

4th floor, 401 Richmond St. W., suite 452

Vtape is excited to present two programs from our Curatorial Incubatees this summer. This year’s Curatorial Incubator v.19: Island in the Streams called for projects that explore collections, how they are accessed online as never-ending digital repositories, and how we can interrupt the stream to create new moments for refuge. Emerging curators do independent research using the rich resources available through Vtape, write a curatorial essay for their program of selected titles, and, finally, present their curated program to the public.

What happened to produce these ruins? Curated by Muriel N. Kahwagi considers moving-image works’ ability to leave a material trace of places, becoming accidental archives that document disappearing landscapes. Looking at the cities of Beirut, Cairo, and Windsor-Detroit, she’s interested in the ways in which video works may (or may not) function as archives for the future – and in the role of artists as (unwitting) keepers of history.

What happened to produce these ruins?

Curated by Muriel N. Kahwagi

Playing Ball, Corinna Schnitt, 2013, 10:00
Set in Detroit, Corinna Schnitt’s Playing Ball (2013) depicts a man and a woman playing a game of pick-up basketball inside what looks like a factory. As it draws to a close, the film reveals a former grand theatre now pressed into service as a lowly parking lot, where civilization itself seems to be dissolving before our eyes.

Saving Face, Jalal Toufic, 2003, 07:19
Jalal Toufic’s Saving Face (2003) depicts posters of the 2000 parliamentary campaign in Lebanon being scraped off the walls one by one. In the process, parts of the faces from other older posters appear underneath, revealing distorted figures.

Night Visitor: The Night of Counting the Years, Maha Maamoun, 2011, 08:30
Maha Maamoun’s Night Visitor: The Night of Counting the Years (2011) is a snapshot of a population in a moment of upheaval. Away from the crowded masses and fervent protests of Tahrir Square that populated the media, Maamoun’s video captures multiple first-person experiences of walking and sifting through state archives.

What to do? Part 1 of a Triptych, Christopher McNamara, 1992, 05:00
Christopher McNamara’s What to do? Part 1 of a Triptych (1992) is a travel brochure of sorts, an invitation to travel beyond the literal meanings of the narrative and the visuals. Set in Windsor, Ontario, this video depicts the desolate structures and dwellings that occupy the city.

Most Fabulous Place, Maha Maamoun, 2008, 01:12
In Maha Maamoun’s Most Fabulous Place (2008), postcards of Egypt’s prime historical and touristic monument, the Pyramids of Giza, are flipped through to a soundtrack composed from dialogues occurring by the pyramids, sampled from a variety of Egyptian films.

All of Your Stars Are but Dust on My Shoes, Haig Aivazian, 2021, 17:35
Haig Aivazian’s All of Your Stars Are but Dust on My Shoes (2021) reflects on the public administration of light and darkness as a surveillance tool. Creating an associative genealogy that moves from whale oil lamps to gas lanterns to LED bulbs, from blackouts to curfews, the film generates a sensorial meditation on how the fundamentals of human vision — light hitting the retina — were mechanized into tools that capture our movements, be it in everyday life or on screen.

Read Muriel N. Kahwagi’s essay in this year’s Curatorial Incubator catalogue here.